graffiti on the blackboard

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graffiti on the blackboard うっちーの独り言やらなんやら。

英語のtipsコーナーのつもりがこんな形に。

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Miracle in Milan, 1951

Miracle in Milan, 1951

(via shinoddddd)

aurorae:

Yamamoto Masao, from the Prism Book

aurorae:

Yamamoto Masao, from the Prism Book

(Source: bremser, via shinoddddd)

shinoddddd:

nsx:

carios:

srgn:

classics:

scalable:

except-musume:

gamagoorikick:

harakirichamber:

mondo-grottesco:

hotmonsters:

humanityistrash:

nkym:

(via popholic)
robot-heart:

(via R2D2 crashed into a flower shop Art Print by Bianca Green | Society6)

(via nemoi)

jocelynbernard:

LEGO album covers - Pink Floyd - The Dark Side of the Moon (by savage^)

jocelynbernard:

LEGO album covers - Pink Floyd - The Dark Side of the Moon (by savage^)

(via nemoi)

(via nemoi)

j-p-g:

Graceful (via y3r_photography)
gainen:

karahori by kikuzumi on Flickr.

gainen:

karahori by kikuzumi on Flickr.

(Source: kan-nen, via nemoi)

(Source: weheartit.com, via shinoddddd)

mossfull:

Midtown Manhattan, 1944

mossfull:

Midtown Manhattan, 1944

(via sho235711)

crochet:

 
A fichu covered the neck and shoulders. This one has been cut from a larger piece of needle lace. It may be related to a set of bed hangings, decorated with bees. (The bee was a Napoleonic symbol.) These bed hangings were originally made at Alençon in France for the Empress Josephine, consort of the Emperor Napoleon, in about 1809. They are now in the Brooklyn Museum, New York.
In the early 19th century the French lace industry largely depended on bobbin lace and machine-made net. Napoleon supported manufacturers of needle lace by making the wearing of French or Brussels lace compulsory at court.

crochet:

A fichu covered the neck and shoulders. This one has been cut from a larger piece of needle lace. It may be related to a set of bed hangings, decorated with bees. (The bee was a Napoleonic symbol.) These bed hangings were originally made at Alençon in France for the Empress Josephine, consort of the Emperor Napoleon, in about 1809. They are now in the Brooklyn Museum, New York.

In the early 19th century the French lace industry largely depended on bobbin lace and machine-made net. Napoleon supported manufacturers of needle lace by making the wearing of French or Brussels lace compulsory at court.

(via fmfy-deactivated20110915)

(via kuriz)

youngjinjun:

Yuki Matsueda

youngjinjun:

Yuki Matsueda

(via shinoddddd)